Remembering April 19th

Apr 15, 2015 by

Partners by Fred StoneOn April 19, 1995, tragedy struck Oklahoma City when the Alfred P Murrah Federal Office Building was bombed, killing 168 people and injuring many more. Longtime client and retired firefighter, Cody Barger, was one of the responders to the scene. Cody and his wife generously donated this signed lithograph on display to honor the lives lost and to remember the heroes involved in the rescue and recovery efforts.

Partners, by Fred Stone, was inspired by a photograph taken by David Allen during the rescue efforts. It features Urban Canine Search and Rescue handler Anthony “Skip” Fernandez III from Miami, Florida, with his golden retriever Aspen. It depicts a fatigued Aspen and Skip after finishing a thirteen hour shift searching for survivors among the debris. Even after the search and rescue teams were notified that all remaining survivors had been removed from the building they continued searching. After finishing his shift, Skip was asked for an interview with the media, but exhaustion won out and he fell asleep while sitting on the curb clutching Aspen. The photo was taken and a surprised Skip was greeted with it the next morning when fellow firefighters showed him the morning newspaper.

In the aftermath of the tragedy, Oklahomans made national headlines for the way they came together to help one another by donating supplies, giving blood, providing meals for the rescue workers, and volunteering to assist in relief efforts. Journalists began to use the phrase Oklahoma Standard to describe this spirit of compassion, generosity, and resilience in the face of devastation.

OKStandardCommitAs we near the 20th anniversary of the Alfred P Murrah Federal Office Building bombing, Oklahoma City leaders are asking for commitments to the Oklahoma Standard Campaign. The campaign asks individuals and companies to commit to one act of service, one act of honor, and one act of kindness during the month of April. As part of the commitment, please donate to support the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum.